Who came first, Gnostics or Christians? Early engravings reveal the truth!

Recently scholars identified what appears to be the world’s earliest Christian inscription, dating to the second century. It is in the collection of the Capitoline Museums in Rome. Orthodox or mainstream Christians argue that Jesus, the historical man came first and that Gnosticism was a later, paganized offshoot of “real” Christianity – if this were true, we would expect the earliest records of Jesus Christ to be more down to earth; however this is the opposite of what we really find.

Every piece of evidence available to us, including this new inscriptions depicts a Gnostic or Pagan worldview. Specifically, the inscription talks about “the Bridal Chamber”, which was an initiation ritual common in Pagan mysteries and also in Gnostic Christianity:

To my bath, the brothers of the bridal chamber carry the torches,[here] in our halls, they hunger for the [true] banquets,
even while praising the Father and glorifying the Son.
There [with the Father and the Son] is the only spring and source of truth.

The Gospel of Philip, one of the Gnostic Gospels found at Naq Hammadi (Egypt) in 1945 which are generally considered to be later than the canonical gospels, is very similar to this “earliest inscription”:

The mysteries of truth are revealed, though in type and image. The bridal chamber, however, remains hidden. It is the Holy in the Holy. The veil at first concealed how God controlled the creation, but when the veil is rent and the things inside are revealed, this house will be left desolate, or rather will be destroyed. And the whole (inferior) godhead will flee from here, but not into the holies of the holies, for it will not be able to mix with the unmixed light and the flawless fullness, but will be under the wings of the cross and under its arms…

When we puzzle in that the Acts of the Apostles itself makes it clear that early Christianity had at least two baptisms, and several levels of initiation, we can’t fail to realize that modern Christianity with its “one baptism for the forgiveness of sins” is not the original form of Christianity! Instead, the earliest Christians practiced an initiation ceremony and viewed Jesus as the divine Logos, the spirit of God in each of us (who was never – and could not be – a historical person).

Later Christians, including even the apostle Paul, all of the four gospel writers, and most Church Fathers, criticize these earlier Christian communities who worshiped Jesus as a divine being without recognizing his Fleshly Nature.

Nevertheless, the ritual of the Bridal Chamber, in which initiates died to their lower self and married their “Sophia” to the “Logos”, fusing the individual self with the universal being, lasted for centuries in the higher levels of initiation, until it was stamped out by the Church, who turned the entire mystery (translated as “sacrament” in Latin) into the sacrament of marriage – that a man and a woman are joined as one flesh forever (even while denying its priests the right to this “sacred institution”).

Read the source article here: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44759608/ns/technology_and_science-science/.

 

 

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  • http://resurrectingpella.blogspot.com Resurrecting Pella

    You make a very interesting statement:

    “the Acts of the Apostles itself makes it clear that early Christianity had at least two baptisms, and several levels of initiation…”

    Could you provide pointers to the actual wording in Acts that support those claims?

    While I definitely agree with the points you make, I’d like to make sure we’re standing on solid ground here.

    • http://www.holyblasphemy.net Derek Murphy

      Thanks for the comment! Check out this page: http://www.holyblasphemy.net/pauls-worst-pupils/christmyththeory. There are a couple passages that show Christianity had more than one baptism.
      “An Alexandrian Jew named Apollo’s now arrived in Ephesus. He was an eloquent man, with sound knowledge of the scriptures, and yet, though he had been given instruction in the way of the Lord and preached with great spiritual fervor and was accurate in all the details he taught about Jesus, he had experienced only the baptism of John. He began to teach fearlessly in the synagogue and, when Priscilla and Aquila heard him, they attached themselves to him and give him a more detailed instruction about the way.” Acts 18:24

      Later, Paul meets some “Christians” and asks them, did you receive the baptism of the holy spirit? (Jesus’ baptism). They say “No – we didn’t know there was such a thing!” “Then what baptism did you receive?” “John’s Baptism – water.” Paul explains to them that Paul’s baptism was for the forgiveness of sins, but there was a 2nd, greater baptism, a baptism of fire and the holy spirit (either one or two separate rituals/levels of initiation). Despite acts and these other passages, the church councils later decided to support ONE baptism for the forgiveness of sins!